PhilHealth should provide incentives to eliminate out-of-pocket expenses

PhilHealth has instituted a no copayment policy for its benefit packages for the diagnosis and management of COVID-19. The costing of these benefit packages is a result of an iterative process involving data collection, stakeholder consultations, and data analysis. As such, we can say that the “maximum” health care cost for a specific service (e.g. … Continue reading PhilHealth should provide incentives to eliminate out-of-pocket expenses

Pandemic Financing: How the World is Funding the COVID-19 Response (Part 3)

What mechanisms are available to fund the pandemic response? The Ebola crisis in West Africa in 2014 highlighted the difficulty in rapidly organizing funding for an outbreak, especially among economically vulnerable countries. To address this and to prevent future financial catastrophes, several financing mechanisms have been presented to countries. These mechanisms aim to fund the … Continue reading Pandemic Financing: How the World is Funding the COVID-19 Response (Part 3)

Pen Point 51

The deluge of health information poses a great challenge to patients, especially if the information cannot be critically analyzed and synthesized. Therefore, it is incumbent for health care providers to examine and integrate into a coherent whole all the pieces of evidence coming from disparate sources, and help patients make sense of the rapidly changing … Continue reading Pen Point 51

Pen Point 50

Evidence-informed policies sound sensible, right? But why does it not often happen, especially in the Philippines? While the use of evidence in decision-making seems logical, policy-making (sadly) often isn't rational. It's almost always political.

Pandemic Financing: How the World is Funding the COVID-19 Response (Part 2)

What are the considerations in the provider payment mechanism? How we raise money to pay for health care is an important issue. But equally important are the daunting tasks of organizing health service delivery, and compensating individuals and organizations that provide these services. To meet the increasing demand for health care services, health care workers … Continue reading Pandemic Financing: How the World is Funding the COVID-19 Response (Part 2)

Pen Point 49

Various provider payment mechanisms will continue to exist in the country’s health care system. Emphasis is placed, however, on the current movement towards using performance-driven, prospective payments (e.g. Global Budget Payment) based on diagnosis-related groups (DRG). The shift to DRG-based GBP will not be easy. Mechanisms should be in place to avoid underprovision and ensure … Continue reading Pen Point 49

Pandemic Financing: How the World is Funding the COVID-19 Response (Part 1)

Introduction Many countries are scrambling to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The primary focus has been on strengthening health systems to improve surge capacity1,2. At the same time, countries are faced with the difficulty of balancing the demands of responding to the pandemic with the need to maintain the delivery of essential health services2. This … Continue reading Pandemic Financing: How the World is Funding the COVID-19 Response (Part 1)

THE CHALLENGE OF ENSURING PHILHEALTH COVERAGE AMONG OFWS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In order to reduce the financial uncertainties associated with future illnesses, Overseas Filipino Workers are encouraged to enroll themselves in the national health insurance program. However, not all OFWs are enrolled in the program or are actively paying their premiums. The reasons behind this include limited knowledge about Philhealth and its services. This, … Continue reading THE CHALLENGE OF ENSURING PHILHEALTH COVERAGE AMONG OFWS

Health Economics Series: Cost Efficiency and Allocative Efficiency

A government can be cost-efficient but have poor allocative efficiency. Cost efficiency achieves the maximum health benefit at a given cost while allocative efficiency maximizes the health of society by achieving the right mixture of health goods and services according to preferences. Say for example the government wants to produce more midwives under a national … Continue reading Health Economics Series: Cost Efficiency and Allocative Efficiency

Health Economics Series: Average Productivity and Marginal Productivity

Average productivity (AP) is simply the quotient of the total output (O) divided by the number of units of a certain input (I) [i.e. AP = O / I]. Marginal productivity (MP), on one hand, is the additional output derived from an additional unit of a certain input [i.e. MP = ∆O / ∆I]. Example: … Continue reading Health Economics Series: Average Productivity and Marginal Productivity